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  • Writer's pictureAshley Sauvé

Mineral Deficiencies and Their Effects on Hair Loss and Fatigue

Minerals are essential nutrients that play a crucial role in maintaining overall health and well-being. They help to support various bodily functions and contribute to the development and maintenance of strong bones, healthy skin, and robust immune systems. However, a lack of certain minerals can lead to a range of health problems, including hair loss and fatigue. In this blog post, we will explore how mineral deficiencies can cause these common symptoms and discuss ways to prevent and treat them.




What are minerals and why are they important?

Minerals are inorganic substances that are found in the earth and in the foods we eat. They are essential for life and play a vital role in supporting various bodily functions. Minerals are the spark plus of your body! Some of the key functions of minerals include:


  • Helping to build strong bones and teeth

  • Regulating muscle contractions and heart rhythm

  • Supporting immune function

  • Maintaining healthy skin and hair

  • Regulating blood sugar levels

  • Supporting thyroid function

There are two main types of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals that the body needs in larger amounts, such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium. Trace minerals, on the other hand, are minerals that the body needs in smaller amounts, such as iron, zinc, selenium, and copper.

While all minerals are important for maintaining good health, deficiencies in certain minerals can lead to specific health problems. In the following sections, we will explore how deficiencies in specific minerals can lead to hair loss and fatigue.


Iron Deficiency & Hair Loss

Iron is a trace mineral that is essential for the production of red blood cells. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. When the body does not have enough iron, it cannot produce enough red blood cells, leading to a condition known as iron deficiency anemia.


Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia and is caused by a lack of iron in the diet or by the body's inability to absorb enough iron from the foods we eat. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include fatigue, weakness, and pale skin. In severe cases, iron deficiency anemia can also cause hair loss.

Hair loss due to iron deficiency anemia is typically diffuse, meaning that it affects the entire scalp rather than specific areas. The hair may also appear thin and brittle. In addition to hair loss, iron deficiency anemia can also cause dry and scaly scalp, as well as scalp irritation and dandruff.

Iron deficiency anemia is most commonly found in women, particularly those who are pregnant or have heavy menstrual periods. Vegetarians and vegans are also at an increased risk of developing iron deficiency anemia due to their limited intake of iron-rich animal products.


Treatment for iron deficiency anemia typically involves increasing the intake of iron-rich foods, such as red meat, poultry, and fish, or taking iron supplements. In severe cases, iron deficiency anemia may require treatment with intravenous (IV) iron.




Zinc Deficiency & Hair Loss


Zinc is another trace mineral that is essential for maintaining healthy hair. It plays a vital role in the growth and development of hair follicles and helps to support healthy hair growth. Zinc is also involved in the production of keratin, a protein that is the main component of hair, skin, and nails.


A deficiency in zinc can lead to hair loss, as well as a range of other symptoms, including poor wound healing, skin rashes, and loss of appetite. Zinc deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of infection, as zinc plays a role in supporting the immune system.

Zinc deficiency is relatively rare in developed countries, but it can occur in people who have gastrointestinal disorders that affect the absorption of nutrients from food, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Vegetarians and vegans are also at an increased risk of zinc deficiency due to their limited intake of zinc-rich animal products.


Treatment for zinc deficiency typically involves increasing the intake of zinc-rich foods, such as meat, seafood, dairy products, and whole grains, or taking zinc supplements. In severe cases, zinc deficiency may require treatment with intravenous (IV) zinc.


Copper Deficiency & Hair Loss

Copper is a trace mineral that is involved in the production of melanin, the pigment that gives hair its color. Copper is also essential for the formation of collagen, a protein that helps to support the structure of hair.


A deficiency in copper can lead to hair loss, as well as a range of other symptoms, including anemia, joint pain, and abnormal heart rhythms. Copper deficiency is relatively rare and is most commonly found in people who have malabsorption syndromes, such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease.


Treatment for copper deficiency typically involves increasing the intake of copper-rich foods, such as nuts, seeds, and leafy green vegetables, or taking copper supplements.


Preventing & Treating Mineral Deficiencies


The best way to prevent mineral deficiencies is to eat a well-balanced diet that includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and protein-rich foods. It is also important to choose foods that are rich in the specific minerals that are necessary for healthy hair growth and overall health.

If you are at an increased risk of developing a mineral deficiency, such as if you are pregnant, vegetarian, or have a gastrointestinal disorder, you may need to take a mineral supplement to ensure that you are getting enough of these essential nutrients. It is important to talk to your doctor before starting any new supplement regimen to ensure that it is safe and appropriate for you.




If you suspect mineral deficiencies are playing a role in your hair loss, I can help! In my 1:1 program Gut Rehab, we test your mineral levels and gut health to ensure you're eating and absorbing the minerals your body needs most.


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