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  • Writer's pictureAshley Sauvé

Your Ultimate Guide to Avoiding Gluten-Cross Contamination

Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune condition that affects the small intestine. It is triggered by the consumption of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. For people with celiac disease, even small amounts of gluten can cause damage to the small intestine, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss. To manage their condition, people with celiac disease must follow a strict gluten-free diet. However, it is important to be aware of the potential for gluten cross-contamination, which can occur when gluten-free food comes into contact with gluten. In this guide, we will discuss how to avoid gluten cross-contamination to help people with celiac disease stay healthy and symptom-free.


What is gluten cross-contamination?

Gluten cross-contamination occurs when gluten-free food comes into contact with gluten. This can happen in a variety of ways, such as:

  • Using the same utensils, cutting boards, or other kitchen equipment for gluten-free and gluten-containing foods

  • Cooking gluten-free and gluten-containing foods on the same stovetop or in the same oven

  • Serving gluten-free and gluten-containing foods on the same plate or using the same serving utensils

  • Eating at a restaurant where gluten-free and gluten-containing foods are prepared in the same kitchen

Why is it important to avoid gluten cross-contamination?

For people with celiac disease, even small amounts of gluten can cause damage to the small intestine and trigger symptoms. This is why it is so important to avoid gluten cross-contamination. Even trace amounts of gluten can cause a reaction in people with celiac disease, so it is essential to take steps to prevent gluten cross-contamination in the kitchen and when eating out.


Shopping for gluten-free food

Shopping for gluten-free food can be challenging, as many products may contain hidden sources of gluten. Here are some tips for shopping for gluten-free food:

  • Read labels carefully: All packaged foods are required to list ingredients on the label. Be sure to read the ingredient list carefully, looking for any sources of gluten such as wheat, barley, or rye. Be aware that ingredients can be listed under different names, such as maltodextrin or dextrin, which may be derived from wheat.

  • Look for gluten-free certifications: Many gluten-free products are certified by organizations such as the Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO) or the Celiac Support Association (CSA). These certifications indicate that the product has been rigorously tested to ensure that it is free of gluten.

  • Avoid foods that are commonly contaminated with gluten: Some foods may be naturally gluten-free, but can become contaminated with gluten during processing or packaging. Examples of these foods include oats and foods purchased from bulk bins, where they may be scooped with the same utensils as gluten-containing foods.

  • Be cautious with processed meats: Processed meats, such as deli meats and hot dogs, may contain gluten as a binding agent. Be sure to check the ingredient list and look for gluten-free certifications when purchasing these types of products.

How to avoid gluten cross-contamination in the kitchen

To avoid gluten cross-contamination in the kitchen, follow these tips:

  • Keep gluten-free and gluten-containing foods separate: Store gluten-free and gluten-containing foods in separate areas of the kitchen, and use separate cutting boards, utensils, and other kitchen equipment for preparing each type of food. This will help to prevent gluten-free foods from coming into contact with gluten.

  • Clean thoroughly: Be sure to thoroughly clean all kitchen equipment, utensils, and surfaces before using them to prepare gluten-free food. This will help to remove any residue of gluten-containing foods that may be present. Use hot water and soap, or a dedicated gluten-free cleaning solution, to clean all surfaces and utensils.

  • Use dedicated gluten-free appliances: If possible, consider using dedicated appliances, such as toasters and microwaves, for preparing gluten-free food. This will help to prevent gluten-free foods from coming into contact with gluten-containing crumbs or residues.

  • Be cautious with shared pantries: If you live with others who eat gluten-containing foods, it is important to keep your gluten-free and gluten-containing foods separate in the pantry. Consider using dedicated shelves or storage containers for your gluten-free foods to prevent contamination.

  • Educate others in your household: If you live with others who eat gluten-containing foods, it is important to educate them about the importance of avoiding gluten cross-contamination. Explain the symptoms of celiac disease and the potential consequences of accidentally consuming gluten. Encourage them to be careful and mindful when preparing food in the kitchen.



Eating out with celiac disease

Eating out can be challenging for people with celiac disease, as it is difficult to control the level of gluten cross-contamination that may occur in a restaurant kitchen. Here are some tips for eating out safely with celiac disease:

  • Research restaurants ahead of time: Look for restaurants that offer gluten-free menu options, or that have experience with preparing gluten-free meals. You can also check online reviews and ask for recommendations from friends or support groups to find restaurants that are knowledgeable about gluten-free diets.

  • Communicate with the staff: When you arrive at the restaurant, let the staff know that you have celiac disease and need to avoid gluten. Ask about their gluten-free options and how they prepare gluten-free meals to prevent cross-contamination. Be sure to emphasize the seriousness of your condition and the potential consequences of accidental gluten exposure.

  • Be cautious with condiments and sauces: Many condiments and sauces contain gluten, so be sure to ask about them when ordering. If in doubt, it is better to omit them or ask for a gluten-free alternative.

  • Avoid shared deep fryers: Many restaurants use shared deep fryers to cook a variety of foods, including both gluten-free and gluten-containing foods. This can lead to gluten cross-contamination, as the oil used in the fryer may become contaminated with gluten. To avoid this, it is best to avoid ordering fried foods at restaurants, or to ask if they have a dedicated gluten-free fryer.

  • Avoid shared platters and buffets: Shared platters and buffets can be a major source of gluten cross-contamination, as gluten-free and gluten-containing foods are often mixed together. It is best to avoid these types of restaurants or to ask for a separate, gluten-free platter.

  • Avoid shared cooking surfaces and pasta water: If gluten-free food is grilled on the same grill as food containing gluten, or gluten-free pasta is cooked in the same water as gluten pasta the food will become contaminated. Watch out for shared toasters as well!

Avoiding gluten in personal care products

In addition to food, gluten can also be found in some personal care products, such as lip balms, hand creams, and shampoos. For people with celiac disease, it is important to avoid these products to prevent accidental gluten exposure. Here are some tips for avoiding gluten in personal care products:

  • Read labels carefully: Just like with food, all personal care products are required to list their ingredients on the label. Be sure to read the ingredient list carefully, looking for any sources of gluten such as wheat, barley, or rye. Be aware that ingredients can be listed under different names, such as hydrolyzed wheat protein or avena sativa extract (derived from oats).

  • Look for gluten-free certifications: Some personal care products are certified gluten-free by organizations such as the Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO) or the Celiac Support Association (CSA). These certifications indicate that the product has been rigorously tested to ensure that it is free of gluten.

  • Choose products made with gluten-free ingredients: Many personal care products are made with naturally gluten-free ingredients, such as aloe vera or coconut oil. Look for these ingredients on the label to ensure that the product is gluten-free.

  • Be cautious with products that are applied to the lips: Lip balms and lipsticks are often contaminated with gluten, as they may be produced on the same equipment as gluten-containing products. Be sure to read the label carefully and look for gluten-free certifications when purchasing these types of products.

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